Power BI Series # 7 – World Bank Indicators: GNI, Atlas method (current US$)

Power BI Series # 7 – World Bank Indicators: GNI, Atlas method (current US$)

The next indicator in this Power BI Series for World Bank Indicators is GNI, Atlas method (current US$) – following is the detail about this indicator.

GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current U.S. dollars. GNI, calculated in national currency, is usually converted to U.S. dollars at official exchange rates for comparisons across economies, although an alternative rate is used when the official exchange rate is judged to diverge by an exceptionally large margin from the rate actually applied in international transactions. To smooth fluctuations in prices and exchange rates, a special Atlas method of conversion is used by the World Bank. This applies a conversion factor that averages the exchange rate for a given year and the two preceding years, adjusted for differences in rates of inflation between the country, and through 2000, the G-5 countries (France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States). From 2001, these countries include the Euro area, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Source: World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.

The live graph be accessed here – GNI, Atlas method (current US$)

Graph View

GNI Atlas-Method graph

Map View

GNI Atlas-Method map.png

Power BI Series # 6 – World Bank Indicators: GNI per capita, PPP (current international $)

Power BI Series # 6 – World Bank Indicators: GNI per capita, PPP (current international $)

The next indicator in this Power BI Series for World Bank Indicators is GNI per capita, PPP (current international $) – following is the detail about this indicator.

GNI per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GNI is gross national income (GNI) converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GNI as a U.S. dollar has in the United States. GNI is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current international dollars based on the 2011 ICP round. Source: World Bank, International Comparison Program database.

The live graph be accessed here – GNI per capita, PPP (current international $)

Graph View

GNI PPP Graph

Map View

GNI PPP Map.png

Power BI Series # 5 – World Bank Indicators: GNI per capita, Atlas method (current US$)

Power BI Series # 5 – World Bank Indicators: GNI per capita, Atlas method (current US$)

The next indicator in this Power BI Series for World Bank Indicators is GNI per capita, Atlas method (current US$) – following is the detail about this indicator.

GNI per capita (formerly GNP per capita) is the gross national income, converted to U.S. dollars using the World Bank Atlas method, divided by the midyear population. GNI is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. GNI, calculated in national currency, is usually converted to U.S. dollars at official exchange rates for comparisons across economies, although an alternative rate is used when the official exchange rate is judged to diverge by an exceptionally large margin from the rate actually applied in international transactions. To smooth fluctuations in prices and exchange rates, a special Atlas method of conversion is used by the World Bank. This applies a conversion factor that averages the exchange rate for a given year and the two preceding years, adjusted for differences in rates of inflation between the country, and through 2000, the G-5 countries (France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States). From 2001, these countries include the Euro area, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Source: World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.

The live graph be accessed here – GNI per capita, Atlas method (current US$)

Graph View

GNI Atlas Graph

Map View

GNI Atlas Map.png

Power BI Series # 4 – World Bank Indicators: GDP Growth (annual %)

Power BI Series # 4 – World Bank Indicators: GDP Growth (annual %)

The next indicator in this Power BI Series for World Bank Indicators is GDP Growth (annual %) – following is the detail about this indicator.

Annual percentage growth rate of GDP at market prices based on constant local currency. Aggregates are based on constant 2005 U.S. dollars. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Source: World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.

The live graph be accessed here – GDP Growth (annual %)

Graph View

GDP Growth Graph

Map View

GDP Growth Map.png

Power BI Series # 3 – World Bank Indicators: Gross Domestic Product (current US$)

Power BI Series # 3 – World Bank Indicators: Gross Domestic Product (current US$)

The next indicator in this Power BI Series for World Bank Indicators is GDP (current US$) – following is the detail about this indicator.

GDP at purchaser’s prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using single year official exchange rates. For a few countries where the official exchange rate does not reflect the rate effectively applied to actual foreign exchange transactions, an alternative conversion factor is used. Source: World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.

The live graph be accessed here – GDP (current US$)

Graph View

GDP Graph

Map View

GDP Map

Power BI Series # 2 – World Bank Indicators: CO2 Emissions (metric tons per capita)

Power BI Series # 2 – World Bank Indicators: CO2 Emissions (metric tons per capita)

The first indicator in this Power BI Series for World Bank Indicators is CO2 Emissions (metric tons per capita) – following is some detail about this indicator.

Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring. Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, United States.

The live graph be accessed here – CO2 Emissions (metric tons per capita)

Graph View

CO2 Emissions Graph

Map View

CO2 Emissions Map

Power BI Series # 1 – Visualizing Interesting Data Around Us

Power BI Series # 1 – Visualizing Interesting Data Around Us

The world is one big data problem – Andrew McAfee

The technology revolution in the last three decades has caused an explosion of data that is unprecedented – the current digital footprint of the world is estimated to be around 8-9 ZB (zettabytes) and is increasing by 40% every year. By 2020, it is expected to reach 44 zettabytes and many studies have shown that less than 1% of this data is analyzed – so the world is indeed a colossal data analysis problem.

In the enterprise space, most public and private organizations today collect massive amounts data for various aspects of their businesses (inventory, supply chain, manufacturing, operations, finance, customer service to name a few) but the decisions still mostly remain ad-hoc and reactive – part of the problem is that traditional Business Intelligence tools have never enabled the end-user / information worker directly and instead only offered static dashboards and KPIs that cannot keep up with the pace of the business and as the corporate dashboards become irrelevant, people go back to using excel spreadsheets for data analysis.

Microsoft Power BI is an exciting new visualization tool that enables information workers to create data visualizations, interactive reports, dashboards and collaborate with these visualizations in real-time. In addition to this there are a range of data analytics backend tools now available in Microsoft Azure like SQL Azure, SQL Data Warehouse, Data Factory, Data Lake Analytics, HD Insight, Machine Learning and Stream Analytics that can be used to process the data to make it ready for a Visualization tool.

Following is one of our sample dashboards “United Nations – World Bank Indicators” that we have put together using Microsoft Power BI.  The indicators represent an interesting view of the world that we live in. The data is openly available on United Nations and World Bank Websites (http://data.un.org/)

United Nations - World Bank Indicators

We will be posting an indicator every day in this series of posts over the next few days – each indicator has a graph view with a country filter that can be used to compare data for different countries and other groups (world, continents, high income, low income, OECD countries etc.) and map view with a year filter that overlays data on a map.

Graph View

Population Growth

Map View

population growth graph

The live graph for the above “Population Growth (annual %)” indicator can be accessed here.